1.13.2009

Cappy's Tug Boat Christmas

The hitch started 2 weeks before Christmas and stretched til a week after New Years. The weather was nice for the most part and most mornings were begun under sunrises like this one. The fog usually set in early, and for one stretch didn't lift for 3 days. The haze and humidity gave some sunsets almost a surreal cast when combined with lights from the platforms we dock at. The afternoon we pulled up at this place in the bay, the sky had a beautiful purple cast, blending in with the lights off the water.

Our little Christmas tree wasn't much, but it did a fine job of cheering up the back corner of the wheel house, along with the presents and stockings for the crew, and the singing snowman that cappyclaus's helper Pegody brought to us one day when we passed by a dock she could reach.
My crew that week, shown here, Darby my pilot on the left and Brian my temporary tankerman on the right were thrilled with the stockings and presents that Peg brought to us. I must say it was tough keeping them out of the "goodies" til Christmas morning.
David, my normal tankerman, shares a love of old gnarly dead trees with me, so I took this picture with him in mind. The old dead cyprus tree is beautiful enough all by itself. The flock of Cormorants that were perched on it, like decorations on some morbid- looking Christmas tree were just an added treat to a dead-tree-lover like me.

Winter sunsets are often quite beautiful, and we never tire of enjoying them. Whenever the man on watch sees a nice sunset he always passes word to who ever is awake and we watch the sun set most days. There were a few foggy evenings and not all sunsets can be enjoyed, but every once in awhile there is one that is so magical ya can't just take 1 picture. The last day on the boat I happened to lookbehind me at some seagulls following behind us in the sunset. I hollered for my pilot to take the wheel, and I stood there taking pictures and just glorying in the beautiful sight, thanking God for the privilege to live and work in the swampy paradise we call home.
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